​​​ The Key to Softened Water? Salt - BWT Best Water Technology 

Salt plays a key role in helping softeners soften your hard water.

The Key to Softened Water?

12.9.2019 0:00   Buckinghamshire

BWT Luxury water softeners remove limescale-causing minerals, so taps and surfaces are scale, scum and smear free. However, water softeners only work efficiently if they are regularly supplied with regeneration salt. Without this, the water softener will not work!

 


However, why do water softeners need salt?


why do water softeners need salt?


Water softeners, such as the BWT WS Series, use a process call ion exchange to remove the substances for example, calcium ions, which can lead to the formation of limescale in pipes and household appliances.

 

 

Hard water passes through the tank or resin vessel of the softener, where millions of tiny resin beads swap the calcium and magnesium in the water for the sodium they are holding. The resin beads absorb the hardness minerals from your water. This process is referred to as the ion exchange. The result you get is softened water.

Once the resin beads are saturated with hardness, they go through a process called regeneration. During regeneration, the resin beads are automatically washed by rinsing them with a small amount of brine (a saltwater solution). The solution is made from salt you add to the water softener cabinet or on larger softeners, the salt tank. The brine forces the calcium and magnesium ions to be released from the tiny beads in exchange for sodium ions from the brine solution, hence the term ‘Ion Exchange.’


Once the resin beads have been refreshed they are rinsed and the brine solution being flushed from the softener with fresh water.

 


When and how often does salt have to be topped up?


The Key to Softened Water? Salt


The amount of salt you use depends on a number of factors:

 

  • How hard the water is in your area
  • The model of the water softener
  • The amount of water your household consumes

 

Maintaining a water softener is simple; salt levels should generally be checked once or twice a month. Salt levels should be at least three to four inches above the water level or just above the halfway mark in the brine tank. Generally, a modern water softener fitted to a four-person family home will use about 10 x 25 kg bags per year. Of course, salt consumption can vary for every household, as the amount of salt you use will depend on how hard the water is in your area and the amount of water your household consumes.

 

You have 2 options: BWT Block Salt & BWT Care Cubes

 

 

 


Common Misconceptions

 

Myth 1: Softened water contains too much sodium

 

Softened water contains too much sodium

 

Softened water does contain an element of sodium, but it is generally too small an amount to make any noticeable difference. We actually consume more sodium from everyday foods such as white bread and soup.

 

 

Whilst most people can safely drink and cook with water from a water softener, BWT advises that people on a low sodium diet or those feeding a newborn baby, should seek medical advice first.

 

 

Myth 2: Water softeners cause water to taste salty


Water softeners cause water to taste salty


Contrary to popular belief, softened water does not taste salty. Whilst a water softener does use salt in the process of softening your hard water, it does not add it to the water you use in your home. The salt is actually used to refresh the resin that removes the hardness minerals that cause scale and scum.

Salt plays a key role in helping water softeners soften your hard water.

 

Working through the water softening system, salt helps reduce the amount of limescale build up in your appliances, which in return, ensures they work more efficiently and last longer. There are also benefits for your pipes, as they remain clearer for longer and your central heating works more effectively –saving you time and money!